ELO Blog - Entrepreneurship, Leadership & Christianity

The purpose of this blog is to offer a Christian perspective on various approaches to innovation and entrepreneurship, leadership and meaning at work from around the world. We review the perspectives of leading thinkers and business people as expressed through their writings or by way of direct interviews.

The ELO Blog additionally highlights key ELO events, interviews and initiatives to support ELO’s vision to be the world’s premier resource for the executive education and training of Christian marketplace and entrepreneurial leaders.


  • Have You Mastered The Craft Of Making Mistakes?

    There is no better person I can think of to write a book on mistakes than John Pearson. That doesnít sound right. Let me rephrase that. John Pearson is an experienced leader and management consultant, recently somewhat retired, who over a long career has seen many mistakes and has no qualms admitting his own. read more
  • Niall Fergusonís Doom(ed): Whack-a-Mole & Dumb Reopening (Part V)

    This is the fifth in a series of five blog posts on Niall Fergusonís Doom[:] The Politics of Catastrophe (New York, NY: Penguin, 2021). Was a lock down necessary? Was it too extreme? Will the massive additional government debt be too big a burden to bear? Ferguson summarizes that unlike the public health response of governments, the monetary and fiscal response was swift and on a massive scale [322] read more
  • Niall Fergusonís Doom(ed): The Psychology of Institutional Incompetence (Part IV)

    This is the fourth in a series of five blog posts on Niall Fergusonís Doom[:] The Politics of Catastrophe (New York, NY: Penguin, 2021). read more
  • Niall Fergusonís Doom(ed): Death, Tragedy & More (Part III)

    This is the third in a series of five blog posts on Niall Fergusonís Doom[:] The Politics of Catastrophe (New York, NY: Penguin, 2021). Reaching into his historianís grab bag, Ferguson deals with catastrophes and cites examples going back to Medieval Europe. He explains that, ďDeath was ubiquitous in the medieval and early modern world in a way that we struggle to imagine.Ē [21] Life spans were shorter, death more frequent and illness ubiquitous. So it should be, according to Ferguson. read more
  • Niall Fergusonís Doom(ed): Lessons From Catastrophes (Part II)

    This is the second in a series of five blog posts on Niall Fergusonís Doom[:] The Politics of Catastrophe. A key outcome of the pandemic is to ask, what have we learned? Ferguson argues that we need to learn the lessons of history in order to enable people to handle future disasters better. read more